Michigan State University

Maps Cataloging Procedures

Finding Copy Records in Sierra, Sky River, OCLC

  • Search in Sierra for map by title or author.
  • If a record is not found in Sierra, search in Sky River, edit as needed, and export to Sierra.
  • If record not found in Sky River, search in OCLC FirstSearch. You will need to create a new record in Sky River and cut and paste the MARC fields from the record found in FirstSearch.

Creating Original Records in Sky River

Please refer to the “Constant Data” tab in the blue folder for the fixed and variable fields you can add to your constant data when cataloging maps.

These are the most important fields to add in your original record:

Fixed fields:

Type- “e” for map

BLvl-“m” for monograph, unless it is a serial (this is not very common)

Elvl- “I”

Desc – “a” for AACR2; “i” for RDA

CrTp-“a” for single map

Relf- type of relief shown on map (see “Relief” tab in blue folder for examples)

SpFm – leave blank unless it’s a globe or atlas

DtSt- “s” unless it’s a facsimile, series, serial or multiple dates indicated on piece

Lang- 3 character language code (see MARC 21 Bibliographic Formats guide)

Ctry-2 character country code(see MARC 21 Bibliographic Formats guide)

Dates- enter one date based on date of situation unless there are multiple dates indicated on piece

Variable fields:

007 (Map format info)

034 (Scale in numerical form)

052 (Library of Congress class – without the “G”)

090 (Library of Congress Classification Call Number) – always followed by “Map” suffix

099 (American Geographical Society Call Number) – always followed by “Map” suffix

100/110 (Author/Main Entry- If there is a clearly discernable author)

245 (Title)

255 (Scale written out in a statement- also coordinates, if found on map)

260 (Date of Publication)

300 (Extent)

500 (Notes)

651 (Geographical subject heading)

650 (Subject heading- if appropriate)

655 (Genre heading- most common is the following: 655_7 Maps. |2 lcgft (For more, see “655 form/genre” tab in the blue folder.

700/710 (Additional authors, if any)

740 (Related title – if item appears in an atlas, etc.)

949 (Local item location fields, work stats)

Other fields may be needed as required.

If you are unfamiliar with MARC fields for map cataloging, please consult the following resources:

  • Cataloging sheet maps : the basics / by Paige Andrew (MSU has this- Z695.6.A55 2003)
  • Cartographic materials – accessed via Cataloger’s Desktop
  • Map cataloging manual / Library of Congress – on Cataloger’s Desktop; (MSU has this- Z695.6.L55 1991).
  • MARC 21 Bibliographic Formats Guide- http://www.loc.gov/marc/bibliographic/
  • Post a question to the MAPS-L listserv - MAPS-L@listserv.uga.edu
  • Email Map Cataloging Guru - Paige Andrew (pga2@psu.edu) – wonderful resource!!!!

CALL NUMBERS

AGS Call Numbers

Each map at MSU Libraries has TWO call numbers- Library of Congress Classification (LCC) call number and an American Geographical Society (AGS) call number.  For detailed information on creating an AGS call number, please refer to the blue folder, sections labeled “AGS Names” and “AGS Numbers.” For information on AGS subject codes, please see “AGS subject codes” tab in blue folder. Below is a brief guide to creating an AGS call number:

  • Identify which country, state, province you have on the map (ex. Panama)
  • Look up the corresponding AGS number in the blue folder tab “AGS #s” – ex. 227 for Panama
  • Add a letter suffix to AGS number:
    • Map sets or series-b
    • Part/section of a Geographic unit-c
    • Map/plan of a city-d

Ex. For Panama City, the AGS number would be 227-d

  • Add the AGS Subject Division letter (for a list, please see the “AGS Subj. codes” tab in blue folder) The subject divisions are the following (the ones in bold are most common)

A- Physical

B- Historical/political

C-Population

D- Transportation and communication

E- Economic

F- Geophysics

G- Geology

H- Hydrography

I- Meteorology and climatology

J- Mathematical geography

K- Astronomy

L- Zoogeography

M- Miscellaneous

N- Index maps

  • Add the date of situation, as indicated on the map, or by estimating the probable date
  • If the area covered on the map is smaller than a country, add a parenthetical statement indicating the area covered ex. (Panama City)
  • Add the “Map” suffix to the call number
  • Your finished call number would look something like this:

Ex. 227-d A-1979 (Panama City) Map

LCC Call Numbers

For help with Library of Congress call numbers, please consult Classification Class G: Geography, Maps, Anthropology, Recreation (at MSU under Z696.U5G 1976). For the most up to date class schedules, see http://classificationweb.net/Menu/index.html  Ask Head of Cataloging for password. Some things to note:

  • Map LC numbers always have the last Cutter go AFTER the date – ex. G4110 1871 .M3
  • If you have two Cutters, a subject Cutter and a Main Entry Cutter, it would look like this:

Ex. G4111.B5 1900 .M3

  • Always check in Sierra to see if there is a duplicate LC call number. Add a number to your last Cutter to distinguish it from the duplicate number.

WRITING ON MAPS

  • Always write on the maps with pencil. Never ever use pen.
  • Write the AGS call number, in general, on the lower right corner of the map
  • Write the LC call number, in general, on the lower left corner of the map
  • You can write the call numbers on archival tape if needed. Ask Kathleen or Elida for some.

SCALE

You need to add the mathematical scale to each bib record in the MARC 034 and 255 fields. (For a great intro on how to do this, please see Paige Andrew’s Cataloging sheet maps, Chapter 11 (p.79). There are several ways to figure out the scale:

  • If you have a scale statement written clearly on the map, ex. 1:2,000,000, then transcribe it that way in your bib record:   255 Scale 1:2,000,000.
  • If there is a graphic representation of scale, or a bar scale, use a ruler to measure how many miles are in an inch. If this is readily apparent, multiply that number by 63,360, which is the number of inches in a mile. Ex. Bar scale says there are 50 miles per 1 inch on the ruler. 50 x 63,360 = 3,168,000. When calculating the scale in this way, always write it like this in your bib record: 255 Scale [ca. 1:3,168,000].
  • Use your scale indicator to measure 1 degree on the horizontal axis (latitude) of your map. Ask Kathleen or Elida for help with this.
  • Please see Cataloging sheet maps  for more examples and a great introduction on measuring map scales.

NOTES

Notes are especially important when cataloging maps; they can be the only logical place to put certain things. For a good intro to note order, please see Rare, antiquarian, or just plain old: cataloging pre-twentieth century cartographic resources / Maps and Geography Round Table, Section 8 “Notes.” Some of the more common notes are (in order that they appear in the bib record):

  • Relief notes
  • Publication notes (i.e., part of an atlas or book)
  • Physical notes
  • Inset or ancillary maps notes

949 FIELDS AND MAP LIBRARY LOCATION CODES

Add a 949 field in your Sky River record to automate an item record:

*ov=.o ;i= /loc=mpcab/ty=199/sta=o/w=cmsorigmapbes

  • For a list of common Map Library locations, please see “Locations” tab in the blue folder.

LIBRARY OF MICHIGAN HAS COPY

If copy is found at the Library of Michigan, use the record, without changing it. Add the following to it:

  • “mp” location code in “Location” fixed field  the bib record
  • Do not add AGS call number in the bib record- add it in the item record under an 099 field
  • Add any gift notes-  ie. “590 MSU Copy: Gift of Ronald Dietz”

OLD AND RARE MAPS

Please refer to the following resources for help with rare and old maps:

  • Rare, antiquarian, or just plain old: cataloging pre-twentieth century cartographic resources / Maps and Geography Round Table. (MSU has this- Z695.6.R37 2007)
  • DCRM(C) Wiki (Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Cartographic) http://dcrmc.pbworks.com/w/page/6107912/FrontPage

MAPS IN RDA

It is not necessary to catalog maps in RDA, since best practices have not yet been published in this content standard. However, I’ve created a Constant Data form for RDA maps, and you can experiment if you wish. I also have numerous record examples- see the white folder labeled “RDA and Maps.” Other good places to refer to for RDA maps cataloging is the MAPS-L listserv and the Online Audio-Visual Cataloger’s (OLAC) group website: www.olacinc.org  Also for a great example in the MSU catalog please see b9833508x.

ATLASES

For an introduction to cataloging atlases, and example bib records of atlases, please see the “Atlas” tab in the blue folder. Also, the Atlas section in Cartographic materials is quite helpful.  You will need to check with Kathleen or Elida about the location codes. Keep the following in mind when cataloging atlases:

  • In MARC fixed field CrTp, use an “e” for atlases
  • In 007 field, second character, use “d”
  • In the 300 field, use “1 atlas” instead of “1 map”
  • Atlases don’t have AGS numbers- only include an LC number
  • Often you will have several scales in an atlas, and will need to indicate this in your 255 scale statement.  i.e., 255 Scales differ.

SERIES AND SETS

For an introduction to, and example bib records of series and sets, please see the “Series and sets” tab in the blue folder. Also consult Cartographic materials via Cataloger’s Desktop. Here are a few key points:

  • Map sets often have a single scale, but not always!
  • Map sets usually have a collective title.
  • Kathleen is a great resource on distinguishing the difference between series and sets- these can be tricky to tell apart.

MSU MAPS CALL NUMBERS

MSU campus maps have a special call number. For a complete bib record example, please see the “Record Ex. (General)” tab in the blue folder. Here are the basics:

  • AGS call number: 843-d A-1950 (East Lansing/MSU) Map
  • LC call number: G4114.E4:2M4 1950 M5 Map

DIGITAL MAPS

There are several types of digital maps. For example bib records of digital maps, please see the “Digital maps” tab in the blue folder. Also consult with Kathleen as to how to best describe these.

FACSIMILES

For example bib records of facsimiles, please see “Facsimiles” tab in the blue folder. Facsimiles understandably cause a lot of confusion, myself included. Nevertheless, they do get easier once you have some practice with them! For bib record examples, please see the “Facsimiles” tab in the blue folder. Most important points about facsimiles:

  • Facsimiles will always have two dates in both their AGS and LC call numbers. For example, from bib record b9823822x, the LC call number is G3290 1596 .B7 1950. The first date is the date of situation of the map, and the second date is the date of reproduction. The AGS number for the same map is 052 A-1596/[1950]. I guessed 1950 as a probable date, and that is why it has brackets.
  • Facsimiles always have a 500 note that says, “Facsimile.”
  • All item locations for facsimiles are “mpfac.”
  • Include both the reproduction date and the original date in the Dates fixed fields.
  • All the publication info should pertain to the facsimile version.
  • Include, if possible, a 534 field with the publication information of the original piece.

UKNOWN DATE

If the date is not found anywhere on the map, take a best guess as to what it might be, given factors such as language used, capital cities and jurisdiction boundaries, population statistics, advertisements, etc.

  • All LC and AGS call numbers must have a date, even if it is a probable date. So do your best and take a good guess. Question marks and “u’s” are not used in any call numbers for maps at MSU.
  • Wrap the probable date of publication in brackets in your bib record and when writing it on the map.

SUBJECT CUTTERS

Some maps may have a Subject Cutter. (See chart below, and see b97947052 for an example). For all subject Cutters, use the date of situation of the map rather than the date of publication. However, for historical or political maps, which have an S Cutter (range .S1-.S73), use the date of publication in the LC call number only. Here is a chart of subject Cutter ranges for G3200, or the World (for an expanded list with more detail, please see Classification Web http://classificationweb.net/) :

G3201.A1-.A9    Special category maps and atlases 

G3201.B1-.B8     Mathematical geography 

G3201.C1-.C95   Physical sciences 

G3201.D1-.D5    Biogeography 

G3201.E1-.E9      Human and cultural geography. Anthropogeography. Human ecology 

G3201.F1-.F9      Political geography 

G3201.G1-.G8    Economic geography 

G3201.H1-.H9    Mines and mineral resources 

G3201.J1-.J95    Agriculture 

G3201.K1-.K6     Forests and forestry 

G3201.L1-.L5      Aquatic biological resources 

G3201.M1-.M95   Manufacturing and processing. Service industries 

G3201.N1-.N858   Technology. Engineering. Public works 

G3201.P1-.P97     Transportation and communication 

G3201.Q1-.Q97    Commerce and trade. Finance 

G3201.R1-.R6      Military and naval geography 

G3201.S1-.S73     History 

RANGE OF YEARS

Occasionally you will find maps that cover a range of years rather than a single year (see b97900746). After conferring with Kathleen, we decided to do the following with these maps. For example, If we have a map of medieval Europe during the years 1100-1500:

  • In the AGS call number, put the range of years in brackets, ex. [1100-1500]
  • In the LC call number, put only the last date, ex. 1500.
  • The finished call numbers look like this: G5701.O1 1500 T4 Map;   600 E-[1100-1500] Map

SUPPLEMENTARY TO A JOURNAL/BOOK

For bib record examples of maps supplementary to a journal or book, please see the “Supplementary maps” tab in the blue folder. Most important to know with supplementary maps:

  • Supplementary maps don’t have AGS call numbers. They do have two LC call numbers- one for the map itself, and one for the journal issue or book that they are a supplement to. For an example of how this looks, please see b100176707.
  • The map call number goes in the 050 field, and the serial call number goes into the 090 and 099 fields.
  • Include a note about the item appearing as a supplement: “Appears as a supplement in International sugar journal, v.115, no.1370.”
  • The location code for supplementary maps will nearly always be “mpsup.”
  • Write the serial call number on the lower right corner of the map, where the AGS call number normally goes. Write the map call number on the lower left corner.

BIBLIOGRAPHY OF MAP CATALOGING RESOURCES

Blue folder- ask Head of Cataloging for this very helpful resource.

Cataloging sheet maps : the basics / by Paige Andrew (MSU has this- Z695.6.A55 2003)

Cartographic materials – accessed via Cataloger’s Desktop

Classification Web (LCC schedules) http://classificationweb.net/Menu/index.html

Map cataloging manual / Library of Congress – on Cataloger’s Desktop; (MSU has this- Z695.6.L55 1991).

MARC 21 Bibliographic Formats Guide- http://www.loc.gov/marc/bibliographic/

MAPS-L listserv - MAPS-L@listserv.uga.edu

Map Cataloging Guru - Paige Andrew at Penn State (pga2@psu.edu)

Classification Class G: Geography, Maps, Anthropology, Recreation (at MSU under Z696.U5G 1976)

Rare, antiquarian, or just plain old: cataloging pre-twentieth century cartographic resources / Maps and Geography Round Table. (MSU has this- Z695.6.R37 2007)

DCRM(C) Wiki (Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Cartographic) http://dcrmc.pbworks.com/w/page/6107912/FrontPage