Marcet, Jane Haldimand. Conversations on Natural Philosophy, in Which the Elements of that Science are Familiarly Explained and Adapted to the Comprehension of Young Pupils. Charleston, S.C., J. Grigg and W.P. Bason, 1824

Originally published in 1819, this is a copy of the second edition. Conversations on Natural Philosophy... was an explanation of the first elements of science for very young children, presented in the familiar style. Jane’s first published book was Conversations on Chemistry, 1806. She was a very prolific author of popular science texts for children, women, and general audiences. In 1829 she published Conversations on Vegetable Physiology, which teaches the structure of plant roots, stems, seeds, plant functions, such as nutrition and transpiration, and applied subjects such as techniques of transplanting and grafting, and about plant diseases. It was a more learned work than many others by women at the time. It received good reviews in the Magazine of Natural History. Jane was the only daughter of a Swiss merchant established in London. She married a physician, Alexander Marcet, in 1799, by whom she had three children. He was a lecturer in chemistry at Guy’s Hospital in London. Through him she had access to contemporary scientific research. She was acquainted with other noted women writers, such as Mary Somerville, Maria Edgeworth, and Harriet Martineau. She wrote anonymously, not thinking of herself as "scientific;" she thought of herself as a popularizer and a teacher, just wanting to be useful. She wrote 19 books altogether.

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